The Gaia Foundation
Welcome to the new Gaia website!
Planning a beach activity?
Download our activity form. Click here!!

SITUATION VACANT AT GAIA FOUNDATION - PROJECT COORDINATOR

SITUATION VACANT AT GAIA FOUNDATION - PROJECT COORDINATOR:

Gaia is seeking to employ a project coordinator to assist in running its natura 2000 coastal management projects. Focus is being given to:

1. drive and initiative
2. qualifications and experience relating to management, environment and marketing
3. good management and personnel skills
4. positive disposition
5. possession of own transport is a great asset.

Applicants are to submit full CV with references, date of birth, nationality and photo by email to by the 21st September, 2014.

We look forward to hearing from you!

 

 

Blue Flag at Ghajn Tuffieha and Ramla Bay

The Blue Flag award for Ramla Bay and Ghajn Tuffieha Bay this year is until the 28th September.

Lifeguards are watching the bay from 11:00 - 19:00 on a daily basis.

Ramla bay is equipped with a beach buggy and a toilet exclusively for people with disabilities. These facilities are available from the Ranger station located outside the beach on a daily basis from 11:00 - 19:00

We remind you, dogs are not allowed on these beaches until the end of the Blue Flag season.

 

 Ranger Station Ramla Bay 2014

Planning a beach activity?

Planning a beach activity?

Please download the application form from the link below and email it to

http://www.projectgaia.org/Download/ActivityApplicationForm.doc

Please do not step on the slopes - Ghajn Tuffieha

Climbing these slopes is very dangerous and critically increases the erosion process.


Please help us to protect the area by using the indicated path

 


About erosion: The archipelago of Malta is made of calcareous and clay rock formations and it is characterized by high coastal erosion. The clay has a softer consistency than the limestone. The power of the sea and the climatic conditions (mainly temperature, wind, humidity and exposure to the sun) act differentially on these rocks; in fact clays are being eroded faster than the limestone.


Sliding down along or climbing this clay slope induces the removal of clay sediments which fall downwards by gravity. These sediments are then removed by the sea.


Thank you for your collaboration.

The Project Gaia (Malta) - 2014                     Photographer: Ana Sofia Gradim Pereira & Gaia Team